Teaching I Appreciate (what about the other 51 weeks?) and more

Tuesday, May 5, 20156:04 PM

Happy Teacher Appreciation Day/Week. If you are reading this blog you are likely a teacher and deserve some recognition for your hard work and efforts. If you've done a quick Google Image search for Teacher Appreciation, you're probably wondering why Ryan Gosling is in every meme. Answer that one for me, faithful reader.

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I think it appropriate today to give thanks to some of the things in teaching and the people that I am thankful for and appreciate. We're all influenced by our colleagues, mentors, and students every day, and as I'm reminded by the Twitter chat #BFC530 whenever I set my alarm, it's important to stay positive. Our job is hard and climate for education is rough right now, but we accomplish so much every day. I'm trying to make more of an effort to be more positive and just focus on being a good teacher.



I'll bring it all back to the idea of take aways from my first post ever. No matter how tough some days can be, no matter the limbo I feel like I'm in, there's something positive everyday. I leave work reflecting on the fun, the learning, and the growth I'm seeing, and think students are as well.

Teacher Appreciation. I'm thankful for these people and things all 52 weeks of the year but like the idea of reflecting on that appreciation today.
  • OHS English Department. I work in a big school where the different departments don't often cross over. We have an English office, that's where we spend our free time. I like my school culture and faculty, but am constantly wowed by my department's support, friendship, and caring for one another, and by our dedication to the hard work we do. We don't all agree on everything or do things the same way, but I've never met a group of harder working professionals.
  • #PLN and Twitter Chats. Until a few months ago, I didn't know what it truly meant to be a connected educator. Now, when I get home from a night away from Twitter and find dozens of mentions, or find posts I find important retweeted, or best of all, when I am able to find resources and answers for my students and my own growth in minutes, I can't imagine life before Twitter. Chats like #njed, #BFC530, #gafechat, #eduafterhours, #podcastPD, and more, always keep me thinking, growing, and positive. These educators have provided a valuable resource for me, which is awesome, and friendship, which is even better. #PLN and #EdJusticeLeague, I appreciate you.
  • Teacher Friends. It's pretty cool that two of my best friends in the world are teacher who I can talk to anything about, personal or professional. They push me, entertain my crazy, and can truly speak my language. Colleagues and connections are important, but it's awesome knowing that my best friends really get it. 



  • Teachers who try new things and share. It's so easy to get caught up in our own world and classroom and keep the good stuff in. I appreciate the teachers who share their challenges and victories in the classroom. When my colleague uses a podcast in class, I want to hear about it and learn from it. When another teacher's students make public service announcements, it inspires me to push my students towards more creation. When I hear about #Periscopse or new tech tools, I want to know what others think. Thanks for sharing.
  • Students who care. All (most?) students care to one degree or another. But I have such a respect for the student who just really shows empathy and an effort towards understanding. Polite enthusiasm, kindness, and interest can be such rare qualities in students today. The student who shakes your hand, asks how your day was, and whose wheels are clearly turning as they are listening in class. I want more of you.
I bet my list can go on and on, and maybe it will. Maybe I'll come back and update this throughout the week, but it's a good start for now. There's a lot to appreciate and be thankful for--I hope to continue to keep that in perspective. 


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